ISBN-10:
0325086753
ISBN-13:
9780325086750
Pub. Date:
11/01/2016
Publisher:
Heinemann
Argument in the Real World: Teaching Adolescents to Read and Write Digital Texts

Argument in the Real World: Teaching Adolescents to Read and Write Digital Texts

by Kristen Hawley Turner, Troy Hicks

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Overview

Every day, our students are inundated by information-as well as opinions and misinformation-on their devices. These digital texts influence what they buy, who they vote for, and what they believe about themselves and their world. Crafting and analyzing arguments in a digital world could be our greatest possibility to improve dialogue across cultures and continents... or it could contribute to bitter divides.

In this book, Kristen Hawley Turner and Troy Hicks draw from real world texts and samples of student work to share a wealth of insights and practical strategies in teaching students the logic of argument. Whether arguments are streaming in through a Twitter feed, a Facebook wall, viral videos, internet memes, or links to other blogs or websites, Turner and Hicks will guide you-and your students- in how to engage with and create digital arguments.

The authors' companion wiki provides all of the links to the web-based examples referenced in the book, as well as additional resources to support you as you implement instruction in digital arguments.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780325086750
Publisher: Heinemann
Publication date: 11/01/2016
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 769,459
Product dimensions: 9.40(w) x 7.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 11 - 17 Years

About the Author

Dr. Kristen Hawley Turner ( @teachkht) is professor and director of teacher education at Drew University in New Jersey. Her research focuses on the intersections between technology and literacy, and she works with teachers across content areas to implement effective literacy instruction and to incorporate technology in meaningful ways. She is the co-author of Connected Reading: Teaching Adolescent Readers in a Digital World and Argument in the Real World: Teaching Students to Read and Write Digital Texts. She is also the founder and director of the Drew Writing Project and Digital Literacies Collaborative.

Dr. Troy Hicks (@hickstro) is a professor of Literacy and Technology at Central Michigan University and focuses his work on the teaching of writing, literacy and technology, and teacher education and professional development. A former middle school teacher, he collaborates with K - 12 colleagues and explores how they implement newer literacies in their classrooms. Hicks directs CMU's Chippewa River Writing Project, a site of the National Writing Project, and he frequently conducts professional development workshops related to writing and technology. Hicks is author of the Heinemann titles Crafting Digital Writing (2013) and The Digital Writing Workshop (2009), as well as a co-author of Because Digital Writing Matters (Jossey-Bass, 2010) and Create, Compose, Connect! (Routledge/Eye on Education, 2014). He blogs at Digital Writing, Digital Teaching. In March 2011, Hicks was honored with CMU's Provost's Award for junior faculty who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in research and creative activity. Most importantly, he is the father of six digital natives and is always learning something new about writing and technology from them. http://hickstro.org/

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments x

A Tool for You: The Companion Wiki 1

Chapter 1 The Nature of Argument in a Digital World 2

What Is Argument in a Digital World? 6

A Brief Overview of Argument (or, What Makes a Strong Argument, Anyway?) 8

The What and How of Writing: Declarative and Procedural Knowledge 9

Declarative and Procedural Knowledge in Digital Writing 10

Why Teach Digital Arguments? 14

Chapter 2 Analyzing Arguments That Are Born Digital 17

"Born Digital" Arguments 18

Gateway Activities for Digital Arguments 25

Looking Ahead 41

Chapter 3 The Moves of Argument in Web-Based Text 42

Characteristics and Content: What Do Blog Posts Look Like? 46

The Craft of Composing: What Does a Student Need to Know and Be Able to Do to Read and Write a Blog Post? 51

Practical Matters: How Does a Writer Attend to Issues of Citation, Plagiarism, and Fair Use When Crafting Web-Based Text? 54

Taking It to the Classroom 58

Chapter 4 The Moves of Argument in Infographics 60

Characteristics and Content: What Do Infographics Look Like? 62

The Craft of Composing: What Does a Student Need to Know and Be Able to Do to Read and Write Infographics? 70

Practical Matters: How Does a Writer Attend to Issues of Citation, Plagiarism, and Fair Use When Crafting Infographics? 76

Taking It to the Classroom 80

Chapter 5 The Moves of Argument in Video 82

Characteristics and Content: What Do Videos Look Like? 84

The Craft of Composing: What Does a Student Need to Know and Be Able to Do to Read and Write a PSA? 88

Practical Matters: How Does a Writer Attend to issues of Citation, Plagiarism, and Fair Use When Crafting Video? 92

Taking It to the Classroom 97

Chapter 6 The Moves of Argument in Social Media

The Problems of Misinformation and Confirmation Bias 103

A Possible Solution; Engaging as Readers and Writers in Arguments Presented 106

Through Social Media 106

Developing Arguments via Social Media 113

Practical Matters: How Does a Writer Attend to Issues of Citation, Plagiarism, and Fair Use When Crafting Social Media? 116

Taking It to the Classroom 119

Chapter 7 Coaching Students' Work with Digital Arguments

Coaching Students as They Read and Write Digital Arguments

Coaching Through Formative Assessment 124

Are We Assessing Declarative or Procedural Knowledge? Form or Substance? 125

Conclusion 137

Works Cited 138

Programs/Websites Mentioned 144

Index 147

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