Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

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Overview

Apples, ho!

When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can't bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel — first there's a river to cross that's wider than Texas...and then there are hailstones as big as plums...and there's even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Those poor pippins! Luckily Delicious (the nonedible apple of Daddy's eye) is strong — as young 'uns raised on apples are — and won't let anything stop her father's darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil.

Here's a hilarious tall tale — from the team that brought you Fannie in the Kitchen — that's loosely based on the life of a real fruiting pioneer.

Apple Facts

More than 7,500 varieties of apples are grown throughout the world.

About 2,500 varieties grow in the United States.

The apple variety Delicious is the most widely grown in the United States.

Apples are part of the rose family.

The science of fruit growing is called pomology.

Fresh apples float. That's because 25 percent of their volume is air.

Cut an apple in half, across the core, and you'll see a star shape.

It takes apple trees four to five years to produce their first fruit.

It takes about thirty-six apples to make one gallon of apple cider.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780689847691
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date: 08/10/2004
Series: Anne Schwartz Books
Pages: 40
Sales rank: 267,029
Product dimensions: 11.00(w) x 8.62(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Deborah Hopkinson is the author of numerous award-winning children's books, including Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt, winner of the International Reading Association Award, Girl Wonder, winner of the Great Lakes Book Award, and Apples to Oregon, a Junior Library Guild Selection. She received the 2003 Washington State Book Award for Under the Quilt for the Night. She lives in Oregon. Visit her on the Web at www.deborahhopkinson.com.

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Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and C 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
kairstream on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Delicious helps her father over the Oregon Trail with her cleverness. Rich language and colorful pictures have students wanting to read this story over and over!
emilylambeth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I think this book would be great to read to a classroom right before the teacher was going to introduce the Oregon Trail. This book gives the student's a taste of what the Oregon Trail is, but it also includes some humor so that the students will become interested and want to learn more. This book is also great because it refers to many famous places along the Oregon Trail.
abarajas09 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Genre: Historical FictionReview: This is a great example of historical fiction on the Oregon Trail. It is a tall tale that is said to be true about a family who travelled to Oregon from Iowa and their experience through the trail. Media: Oil Paint
lynzees on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book featured a girl hero who conquered the great trip out west. Very exciting book, and great for integrating history into reading and making it fun. Suggested for middle elementary age as some words are more difficult for younger readers.
sunnyd77 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I LIKE THIS BOOK BECAUSE THE MAIN CHARACTERS ARE SPUNKY!!! AND THE LITTLE GIRL IS SO CHARASMATIC AND COLORFUL! I ALSO LIKE THIS BOOK BECAUSE THE BOOK NOT ONLY TEACHERS CHILDREN TO PRACTICE TEAMWORK BUT ALSO IT TEACHES ABOUT GEOGRAPHY,
lmaddux on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A story of apples being brought to oregon by a pioneer. It is a fun book to read-aloud. Text-to-text connection. Great for younger readers too.
megryan21 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I thought it was a cute book with lots of humor. It can get kids into a good mood, a happy mood.
KenBlasters on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a good story to teach about persistence and will power
melissaboyd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
this is a great book when teaching about the pioneers and traveling out west.
rbelknap on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a folk tale. It is a folk tale because it is a story about the person that brought apples to Oregon by way of the Oregon Trail. No single person brought the ansetors of all the apple trees in Oregon.In this story the dad of the family could not bear to leave his apple trees in Iowa, where they were leaving for the west, so he takes them with them on the Oregon Trail. In the story it seems like the cares more about his plants making it to Oregon than his family. But they do all survive the trip including all the trees.Age Appropriateness: Primary, IntermediateMedia: Oil Paints
fullerl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Delicious and her family set out to cross the country with a wagon full of baby trees. They are headed to Oregon, but as the reader discovers, the trail to Oregon is fraught with dangers for little trees - and people! Delicious and her family battle the elements to bring their baby nursery stock to the Oregon frontier. The voice in this story is young and vibrant with colorful pictures full of humor as an accompanyment. A delightful book that children would happily read again and again.
crystalr on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is definitely a Read Aloud book! Illustratons ake this book alot more appealing
bsturdevant06 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Primary, IntermediateThis is a god example of historical fiction. It shows a good understanding of what was happening during the time of the Oregon trail. It makes the trip on the Oregon trail something that can be related to by the way of a fictional story. Although it does have some truth to the story. The plot is pretty straight forward being a people against nature. It is the attempt to get the plants across the Oregon trail. It gives a good since of challenge and resolution when they get Oregon and have them planted. Media: Oil Paints
TaraThompson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Good for teaching about the Oregon Trail.(3-4th)I enjoyed this book because it was witty and clever.Fun to read in class.
ggenao on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book cary the power of being determine and the value of growing and loving each other has a family
ElaniRichards on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story is sort of goofy, but it is a fun read-aloud. The illustrations are hilarious too. Lots of details to pull out of it--similes, alteration, puns, and reading for humor. I would ask my students to see which character they relate to, or if they see someone in the story that reminds them of relative or friend. Perhaps reading a page, and then having them make their own illustration, before they see the illustrators version could be fun.
kmacneill on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a great folk tale. It¿s a fun read aloud. It¿s the fictional story based loosely on facts about the man and family who brought apples to Oregon. It is told through the brave daughter¿s perspective. This book has many various things that students can learn from such as alliteration, voice, similes, and humorous writing. The illustrations are great. This would be a great read aloud in class. I would use it to demonstrate tall tales that are loosely based on facts. I would love to have the kids find events in history and make their own tall tales loosely using the facts they learn.
JoseDelAguila on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The eldest daughter of a large pioneer family, narrates this exuberant tale of her family's journey west.They overcome numerous obstacles to take a wagon load of fruit trees from Iowa to Oregon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book for a young friend. I decided to read it before wrapping it. I have since purchased 6 - one for myself and the rest as gifts for my reader friends.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My family loved Fanny in the Kitchen and this slightly true account of how Oregon's orchards got their start is equally delectable. A great read-aloud for the family, or for the classroom