All Summer Long

All Summer Long

by Hope Larson

Paperback

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Overview

All Summer Long, a coming-of-age middle-grade graphic novel about summer and friendships, written and illustrated by the Eisner Award–winning and New York Times–bestselling Hope Larson.

Thirteen-year-old Bina has a long summer ahead of her. She and her best friend, Austin, usually do everything together, but he's off to soccer camp for a month, and he's been acting kind of weird lately anyway. So it's up to Bina to see how much fun she can have on her own. At first it's a lot of guitar playing, boredom, and bad TV, but things look up when she finds an unlikely companion in Austin's older sister, who enjoys music just as much as Bina. But then Austin comes home from camp, and he's acting even weirder than when he left. How Bina and Austin rise above their growing pains and reestablish their friendship and respect for their differences makes for a touching and funny coming-of-age story.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780374310714
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date: 05/01/2018
Series: Eagle Rock Trilogy Series
Pages: 176
Sales rank: 126,659
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 10 - 12 Years

About the Author

Hope Larson adapted and illustrated A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel, which spent forty-four weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and for which she won an Eisner Award. She is also the author and illustrator of Salamander Dream, Gray Horses, Chiggers, and Mercury, and the author of Compass South and Knife's Edge, both illustrated by Rebecca Mock. She lives in Los Angeles.

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All Summer Long 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
JillJemmett 10 months ago
There are a lot of middle grade graphic novels set in the summer. The summer is a funny time in childhood because you’re in between grades at school, and you don’t get to see your friends. I can see why this is a setting in so many kids books. The main character, Bina, is going through a difficult time. She is often pushed to the side at home because her older brother is adopting a baby with his husband. Her best friend, Austin, has gone away to soccer camp. She hangs out with Austin’s sister, but she only spends time with Bina when it’s convenient for her. These are difficult things to deal with, but they go along with growing up. There was also some diverse representation in the story. Bina is mixed race. Her brother has a male partner. Austin’s sister dates an Asian boy. It’s nice to see some subtle representation in this story, where it is just a natural part of life. I really enjoyed this middle grade novel.
JillJemmett 10 months ago
There are a lot of middle grade graphic novels set in the summer. The summer is a funny time in childhood because you’re in between grades at school, and you don’t get to see your friends. I can see why this is a setting in so many kids books. The main character, Bina, is going through a difficult time. She is often pushed to the side at home because her older brother is adopting a baby with his husband. Her best friend, Austin, has gone away to soccer camp. She hangs out with Austin’s sister, but she only spends time with Bina when it’s convenient for her. These are difficult things to deal with, but they go along with growing up. There was also some diverse representation in the story. Bina is mixed race. Her brother has a male partner. Austin’s sister dates an Asian boy. It’s nice to see some subtle representation in this story, where it is just a natural part of life. I really enjoyed this middle grade novel.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
Over one summer, Bina’s world totally changes. She liked her predictable world and she was feeling left out as everyone around her moved and she stood still. Her best friend went to camp without her and without him, she was lost. Bina tries to find things to entertain her, to make her days eventful, but things just weren’t the same. I liked how this graphic novel dealt with friendships, both long-term and potential ones. Bina wanted to find some new connections but where exactly would they come from? What she really needed was to find some that would be beneficial for her. As Bina’s best friend found another means to spend his summer, she was lost as to what this meant, exactly. Where did that leave her? What happened to their relationship? Did she matter anymore? Communication and emotions were addressed in this novel, both great subjects that are usually difficult at this age. There were highs and lows in this topic and it all depended upon who you were, where you were and what you were doing. The only issue I have with this novel is that I felt at times the language didn’t flow right for me. It felt choppy at times. I liked the ending, I thought that it was an indirect way of solving one of the issues. I think some readers will be able to see themselves in this novel which is a positive thing.