Agnes Grey (Illustrated + FREE audiobook link + Active TOC)

Agnes Grey (Illustrated + FREE audiobook link + Active TOC)

by Anne Brontë

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� Includes beautiful artworks and illustrations
� A link of a FREE audio book to download at the end of the book
� Active Table of Contents for an easy navigation within the book
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Agnes Grey is the debut novel of English author Anne Bront�. The novel follows Agnes Grey, a governess, as she works in several bourgeois families. It is suggested the novel is largely based on Anne Bront�'s own experiences as a governess for 5 years. Like her sister Charlotte's novel Jane Eyre, it addresses what the precarious position of governess entailed and how it affected a young woman.

The choice of central character allows Anne to deal with issues of oppression & abuse of women and governesses, isolation and ideas of empathy. Agnes Grey also mimics some of the stylistic approaches of bildungsromans, employing ideas of personal growth and coming to age, but representing a character who in fact does not gain in virtue. (Wikipedia)

Product Details

BN ID: 2940148142782
Publisher: ngims Publishing
Publication date: 06/30/2013
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

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Agnes Grey 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Today's society is given to speed: cars, movies, the ever popular video games; so a book of quietude won't attract very many. Too bad. Agnes Grey is well written, containing words which have gone out of style and words in their correct usage. An astute observation will bring out the fact that we have all become Miss Agnes Grey, plodding through life, awed by our betters and, often, afraid to see our own worth. The writing contains no swash or buckle. Nothing much "happens", and yet the tale progresses from beginning to end - and a tiny bit beyond, in a beckoning manner: come look over just the next hill, won't you? It is a cozy fireside chair, a small table holding a pot of tea and biscuits with, perhaps, a small dog or cat curled up close by. If you are at a loss to picture such a quiet retreat then I recommend you visit with Miss Agnes Grey and discover what you've lost. With a minimum of effort I think you will find yourself pleasantly surprised.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A delight to read, like all Bronte works. ~*~LEB~*~
annbury on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Unexpected and involving -- this is the first novel I've read by "the other Bronte", and it was both a big surprise and an engrossing read. Anne Bronte, of course was the youngest of the Bronte sisters; she wrote two novels before her death at the age of 29. She has nothing like the literary reputation of her two sisters, Emily and Charlotte. Some would argue that had something to do with Charlotte's comments after Anne's death, but it also reflects a very different style.For me, the surprise in "Agnes Grey" was how little it reminded me of the work of Charlotte and Emily. There's much in common (especially with Charlotte), most of which reflects the Brontes' own lives -- an initial setting in Yorkshire, a close if impoverished clerical family background, a strongly moral view of life. But "Agnes" is far less dramatic than the works of the elder Brontes, far more concerned with social distinctions, and far more focussed on marriage. The mood is very different; realistic rather than romantic, and social rather than isolated. And the style is also very different; very clear, very objective, and decidedly (part of the time) ironic. All in all, "Agnes Grey" reminds me more of Jane Austen than of the elder Brontes, especially the Jane of "Mansfield Park". Like Fanny Brice in "Mansfield", Anne Bronte's Agnes is an outsider and social inferior in her milieu, and is also much involved with personal morality. She can in fact lapse into priggishness, but not too often, and there are hints of potentially radical social views beneath the mid- Victorian morality. Many of the minor characters (particularly the nasty ones) are one dimensional, but the dimension is brilliantly sketched out. For me, this was an engrossing read, and I would recommend it to readers who enjoy Victorian literature, but have not yet experienced Anne Bronte. I shall put her other novel, "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" on my to-read list.
AshRyan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As a novel that follows the plight of a young woman forced into the position of a governess to make ends meet, Anne Bronte's Agnes Grey has of course often been compared with her sister's more famous novel Jane Eyre. And as a love story, it has also been compared with the novels of Jane Austen. It even reminded me a little of the cautionary morality tales that had been popular up to that time, such as Defoe's Moll Flanders.Personally, I enjoyed it more than Pride and Prejudice, but not as much as Jane Eyre. It just doesn't have the same scope and depth. That said, it is a nice little novel, and interesting, and sometimes very funny. Well worth reading.
TheNovelWorld on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Somewhere in the middle of Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. Agnes Grey lacks character development and plot.
Aleksandra on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Some consider Anne Bronte the least "creative" of the three sisters and say that her style is less aesthetically pleasing. I, however, like her work far more than that of Charlotte or Emily. "Agnes Grey" is a touching story told in a language that is as concise as it is vivid. Kudos to Anne Bronte!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed previous Bronte sisters book, and had been delighted to see this one offered through Early Bird Books. I was determined to finish it, because after all she was a Bronte, and the book was free. How could I squander that opportunity to read a book by the lesser-known sister? But I didn’t enjoy the experience for much of the book, because I found the protagonist’s consistenly negative attitude to be off-putting. However, I came to appreciate her, when she started taking up for “the cottagers,” who were local poor people with varying difficulties including blindness. She even spent some of her free time reading to a partially-blind cottager. Regardless of your feeling about the book, I believe that all readers of “Agnes Grey” would agree that along with her sisters, Anne Bronte was also a very gifted writer.
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Catnap and torture Shatter Karma Talon Panther Dismay and Ender at hamlet result two. Thanks
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To be honest, not a whole lot happens in this book as far as plot goes, but I surprisingly liked it. The narration was not thick and heavy. It almost sounded as though a person from today was talking, the way some things were worded. The main character (who does most of the narration throughout the book) was able to get her points across clearly in a way you could understand quite well. I was able to identify in many ways with circumstances the character found herself in. Many times I stopped after reading something and thought, "Someone back then thought that, too?" The only thing I wish the author would have included is a scene at the end where Mr. Weston tells Agnes what it had been about her that attracted him to her (like personality, wit, etc.?-- sort of like at the end of "Pride and Prejudice"). There is never a reason given anywhere in the story, so we're to assume that it is because Agnes is the heroine of the book (which is NOT a good enough reason!). I know several people have expressed a wish see this done as a movie, but frankly I don't think it's filmable. It's great as a book, but as a movie (unless the director took great liberties with the storyline) would be flat and dull. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in all things Bronte-- it's a sweet story.
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Next res
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