10,000 Dresses

10,000 Dresses

Hardcover

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Overview

Every night, Bailey dreams about magical dresses: dresses made of crystals and rainbows, dresses made of flowers, dresses made of windows. . . . Unfortunately, when Bailey's awake, no one wants to hear about these beautiful dreams. Quite the contrary. "You're a BOY!" Mother and Father tell Bailey. "You shouldn't be thinking about dresses at all." Then Bailey meets Laurel, an older girl who is touched and inspired by Bailey's imagination and courage. In friendship, the two of them begin making dresses together. And Bailey's dreams come true!

This gorgeous picture book—a modern fairy tale about becoming the person you feel you are inside—will delight people of all ages.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781583228500
Publisher: Seven Stories Press
Publication date: 11/01/2008
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 267,306
Product dimensions: 8.19(w) x 10.28(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile: AD540L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

An actor, writer, and director, MARCUS EWERT is also the creator of the hit animated children’s series Piki & Polo, which appeared on MTV’s Logo channel. He is currently writing a memoir of his time with Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. Ewert lives in San Francisco.

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10 000 Dresses 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
bnhays on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
YOUNG TRANSGENDERED BOY, BAILY, FEELS THAT HE IS A GIRL AND DREAMS OF BEAUTIFUL DRESSES. BAILY TRIES TO TELL HER FAMILY BUT THEY PUSH HER AWAY AND ARE MEAN TO HER SAYING SHE IS A BOY. FINALLY BAILY FINDS A FRIEND THAT ACCEPTS HER. THIS IS A BIG BOOK FOR CHILDREN AS IT DEALS WITH A VERY CONTREVERSIAL ISSUE. I ENJOYED IT AND THE ART WAS STUNNING.
limeminearia on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Bailey wants to make beautiful dresses - ¿dresses made of crystals and rainbows, dresses made of flowers, dresses made of windows.¿ But Bailey¿s family is sure she shouldn¿t. Her mom asks "What are you talking about?" her dad gets angry and tells her "Don't ever mention dresses again." Her brother threatens "That's gross.... Get out of here before I kick you." But Bailey doesn¿t feel like a boy. She feels like a girl and she has a creative vision (ten thousand visions, really) to express. No matter how many times she hears ¿You shouldn¿t be thinking about dresses at all.¿ or "You're a boy." Boys don't wear dresses !...that¿s that!¿ Bailey still dreams about what she wants. It¿s bad enough that no one understands her and that people seem so upset, but Bailey can¿t even fully escape into the fantasy of fashion and beauty she dreams of because she doesn¿t know how to sew. Then Bailey makes a friend, an older neighbor girl named Laurel who has a knack for making things and is looking for ideas. Together they embark on the first dress and into a world of collaboration and affirmation for Bailey. You get the sense that this one victory isn¿t going to fix everything but that Bailey gains some control and self-expression and that will help her thrive.The author of 10,000 DressesMarcus Ewert, knows how much need there is for a story to help kids who don't fit gender norms. As a teenager he felt isolated (although he did have RuPaul for a pen pal!) and when he left home he threw himself headlong into the world of gay cultural icons. Two of his boyfriends were William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, he graced the cover of Pansy Division albums and he starred in films by directors Gus Van Sant and Sadie Benning. In an interview with EdgeBoston Ewert talks about how self-protective he was when young: ¿Or at least I honestly don¿t think I would have survived outside of my bubble, though--I think I would have killed myself. As it was, by the time I hit puberty, I had really acute social anxiety. I was deathly afraid of other teenagers. Just going to the mall was agonizing. I was so sure that roving bands of teens would see me, spot my gayness, and come attack me. This never happened to me--I was never even jeered at--but I lived in mortal fear of it all the same.¿As librarians I think it is important that we be aware how much impact the inclusion of a single book within our collections can have for a parent or child like this who acutely needs to see themselves reflected in the external world. This is the first picture book with a transgender protagonist. Although this isn¿t perfect (some of the cut paper art is a bit too stiff and flat, with expressions that change little from page to page) it is overall a nicely done fairy tale about self-acceptance and the power of creativity to elevate and save. In the same interview Ewart says:¿So, this book is equally about what happens when you have these beautiful dreams, or visions, or ideas/ideals, and the people around you absolutely don¿t want to hear about it. Which--you know--happens a lot in the real world. And then, on the flipside, the story shows what happens when you finally do find someone who¿s inspired by you, how wonderful that is.¿It would be a mistake to think that this book would appeal only to a small segment of the population. On the contrary, most kids in the picture book audience age range are fascinated by gender and gender roles. They are likely going to be exposed to gender binaries, homophobia and transphobia before they exit grade school, but there is little likelihood that they will come across many books to counter the prevailing attitudes. As Angie Manfredi writes in the journal Young Adult Library Services: ¿inclusion of titles with LGBTQ content allows librarians to familiarize students of any sexual orientation with the fact that the library has a large selection of titles that can speak directly to their experiences.¿ Any public library would do well to include 10,00
Anjoel22 More than 1 year ago
The first of its kind, this childrens book lovingly deals with the subject of gender identity. The main character is a young boy who refers to himself as she. She has a facination with fantastical dresses that she imagines up. The parents remind her that she is a boy and "BOYS DO NOT WEAR DRESSES". She soon finds a new friend busy at work on a sewing machine. She tells the new friend of her imaginative dress concepts which leads to a magnificent collaboration and the beginning of a beautiful friendship. For the first time she is accepted for who she is. This book is a beautiful example of the beauty of childhood imagination and more importantly the often fleeting childhood practice of tolerance.
SilentRose More than 1 year ago
Best+book+ever