The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 203 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Since I was a child, my favorite movie has always been The Wizard of Oz. I can remember having the entire collection of plastic Oz characters, a Wizard of Oz lunch box, sleeping bag, and of course the famous back pack. I dressed up as Dorothy at least twice for Halloween and forced my dog along the way acting as Toto. But something I had never realized was that I never read the book. Recently comming across the opportunity to do so, I find the book just as amazing as the movie--if not better. Although I couldn't seem to get the image of Judy Garland out of my mind, I found that Dorothy is more adventureous than ever in Baum's novel. By reading The Wizard of Oz readers find out that the Land of Oz is even more fantastic than portrayed in the film version. Dorothy and company befriend a Queen of Mice, a China Princess, and even the King of the Flying Monkeys. Reading Baum's novel made me realize the wonders of being a child and visioning the fantastic voyage of Dorothy; however, the novel also made me realize that The Wizard of Oz is not only for children, but for adults as well. Reading this novel gives adults a chace to escape from the chaos of everyday life and enter a world full of wonder and excitement (not to mention the chance to revisit childhood). Baum's novel reminds us the of meaning of friendship, courage, love, and most of all that 'there is no place like home.' I recommend readers of all ages to revisit this timeless classic and enter into the Wonderful World of Oz.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have always loved the Wizard of Oz, it was probably the first live action film I ever saw and has greatly affected my life, fostering my love of musicals into something more than Disney ever could. I thought it was the greatest thing ever. Then I read the book when I was seven, I had just discovered it in my Grandfather's attic, and I decided that the book was by far superior. The story was longer, there was backstory, and it didn't have the weak, 'It was all a dream' ending, which I had always found disappointing. My love of the book was reaffirmed last year in my U. S. History class when the allegory of the novel was discussed in a featured essay, relating it to the argument between the gold and silver standard of the late 1800s. I highly recommend this book to anyone, but especially children with imaginations that need space to grow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book Its way better than the movie
Guest More than 1 year ago
Can you imagine that during World War II, two Australian brigades in North Africa actually marched into battle singing, 'We're off to see the Wizard/The Wonderful Wizard of Oz'? This just goes to show the appeal The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has, not only to children, but also to those special adults young in spirit. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a fantasy written by L. Frank Baum. It tells the story of Dorothy, a young farm girl from Kansas who is carried away by a cyclone to a strange land called Oz. In order to return home, she must travel to its capital, Emerald City, and ask the assistance of the Wizard of Oz. On her journey along the Yellow Brick Road, she meets three companions, a tin woodman, a talking scarecrow, and a cowardly lion with whom she has a series of adventures. Each has their own quest and individual wishes to fulfill. Upon reaching the Emerald City, Oz promises to fulfill their wishes if one of them first kills the Wicked Witch of the West. In my opinion, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz teaches, in a most entertaining way, a valuable lesson to all its readers - look no further for happiness than within yourself. Obviously, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a book worth reading. In addition to its entertainment value, it also inspires its readers to be happy with what they already possess. The characters in the story, Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion desperately desired things that they thought would make them happy, when in reality, they already possessed those things. True happiness has to come from within and the search for happiness should always begin there. This a valuable lesson for us all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
People who give bad ratings should give a reason not to get the book. Instead of saying this book is stuipid. You can still say it's stuipid after you give the reason.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is awesome and a good classic for kids
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good story with interesting characters and a good plot! It is very different than the movie, but that is a plus!
she_climber on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! I've seen the movie several times but I can't believe how much I enjoyed the story. The little things that were different, the big things that are different. No wonder this is such a timeless classic.
BellaFoxx on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia"The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children¿s novel written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W. W. Denslow. Originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Chicago on April 17, 1900, it has since been reprinted numerous times, most often under the name The Wizard of Oz, which is the name of both the 1902 stage play and the 1939 film version. The story chronicles the adventures of a young girl named Dorothy Gale in the Land of Oz, after being swept away from her Kansas farm home in a storm. Thanks in part to the 1939 MGM movie, it is one of the best-known stories in American popular culture and has been widely translated. Its initial success, and the success of the popular 1902 Broadway musical which Baum adapted from his original story, led to Baum¿s writing thirteen more Oz books. The original book has been in the public domain in the US since 1956."At the end of the book Wicked was a copy of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. I had already read this by then, all the Oz books are available free for iBooks and Kindle. I¿m sure for other readers also.Although I had never seen the movie(1939 MGM) in its entirety or read the book, I knew the general story. After all ¿it is one of the best-known stories in American popular culture¿. The book is of course different from what I had gleaned from the movie, there is of course more detail and more things happening.SPOILER ALERTWhen Dorothy asks the Wizard of Oz to send her back to Kansas he tells her: ¿In this country everyone must pay for everything he gets. If you wish me to use my magic power to send you home again you must do something for me first. Help me and I will help you.¿Now this may seem reasonable and fair except that the Wizard doesn¿t have magic power and knows he can¿t send Dorothy back! And what does he want Dorothy to do? ¿Kill the Wicked Witch of the West¿. His reasoning is that the Wicked Witch is ¿tremendously Wicked¿and ought to be killed.¿When Dorothy and her group find out that he is not a wizard, just a man, he insists, ¿I¿m not a bad man, I¿m a bad wizard.¿He lies, (he¿s been lying for years we find out), sends out a little girl to either kill or be killed, knowing that if she kills the Witch he can¿t keep up his end of the bargain but he¿s not a bad man. Even if she is protected by the Good Witch¿s sign on her forehead and wearing shoes that contain a powerful charm, she doesn¿t know how to use the shoes and still a little girl is sent out to KILL SOMEONE! In what world is that right? In what world does a `good man¿ do that? And then when he figures out a way to get out of Oz, he leaves Dorothy behind.Plus, Dorothy should have really had a leash for Toto. And when Dorothy had to go see Glinda, why didn¿t she just ask the flying Monkeys to take her there? She knows they can, they can¿t take her to Kansas but they can take her anywhere in Oz. Then they wouldn¿t have spent weeks walking and climbing over walls and breaking little china people.For the above reasons I gave this book 2-1/2 stars instead of 3, because these things really upset me.
ryuuta on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This story's main character is Dorothy.She is threw away by typhoon to country of Oz.she want to go back home,then, her adventure began with scarecrow, woodcutter and lion.Throught adbenture, they learn important thing.Can they go back home?I think this story is interesting.Almost all of people know this story. This story tell me what is the most important thing.I learn them again.I want children to read this book.
melopher on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Maybe it was because I never read the book when I was young, or maybe I simply don't have an innate appreciation for fantasy literature, but this book--like the movie--is just weird to me. My girls (whom I read the book aloud to) thought that it was pretty good; they have yet to see the movie. All that said, I'm glad to have read it--simply because it makes me feel more culturally literate. : )
soylentgreen23 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Baum set out to create a modern myth for children, taking, perhaps, the stories of Hans Christian Andersen as a template. He achieved that, with a story that has passed down through the generations and is as celebrated today as it ever was. However, for many of us - myself particularly - knowledge of the story is clouded by familiarity with the movie versions; so it was nice to go back to the source and see what the original was all about.
bzedan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I wish the version I read had the pictures I remember from the little hardbacks (the old library kind where the cover of a mass-market paperback is removed, the book is re-bound and the cover paper is pasted onto the new hard cover). The hammer-heads creeped me out.Baum has such a weird cadence to his writing. Classic story telling filtered through his brain, I guess.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I never read this in childhood, but I loved the Judy Garland film as a child. The book is a charmer, worth reading even if you've seen the film countless times. There are quite a few differences. For one the illustrations suggest a very young Dorothy--about six or so--not sixteen like Judy Garland in the film. The Dorothy of the book wears silver shoes, not ruby slippers. There are lots of other small details that are different, as well as whole chapters that never made it into the film--such as "The Queen of the Field Mice" and "The Dainty China Country." One thing was really striking given the film adaptation. Everything in Kansas is described as gray, the "sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass" and even Uncle Henry's and Aunt Em's faces are gray--then when she gets to Oz it's filled with vibrant color. It seemed so right then that the part of the movie set in Kansas is black and white, while Oz is filmed in color. I don't know that as an adult, this quite appeals to me as much as Lewis Carroll's Alice books, and I don't think I'll be seeking out the rest of the series (Baum wrote 14 in all) but I can certainly see why this is seen as the classic American children's book, the way Carroll's is for Britain or Grimm's Fairy Tales for Germany.By the way, I've read the books were continually challenged from the time the first was published (1900) to as recently as 1987 because they presented some witches as good--and because it featured strong female characters. Heavens. And I thought the uproar over Harry Potter among some was screwy....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There is nothing better than enjoying the original works of such a beloved movie from one's childhood. It really does answer some of those questions people keep asking after watching the movie, and adds new understanding to what was already there. In short, I love it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book and the movie
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Definetly one of my personal favorites! I would definetly read this again. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Five star rating. MUST READ!!!!!
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Rachel Jillian Glennen Lucy Miriam Glennen
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Buy this TODAY!!!!!! Best book ever!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago