Tigerheart

Tigerheart

by Peter David

Paperback

$12.00
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Tigerheart 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Overby More than 1 year ago
if you think oddly named characters that go to oddly named lands is enough to make a story good, this one's for you. The characters are ridiculous and impossible to care about...I made it thru a little over 100 pages and still couldn't figure out if the main character is loonie-crazy or what and it got to the point I didn't care. It's all non-sensical and how it's gotten compared to Peter Pan is beyond me. Do a re-read of Peter Pan instead.....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If I had wanted to read Peter Pan, I would have bought it. Since when are you allowed to change the names of the characters in a classic, paraphrase it and put your name as author? This was a real disappointment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Between harriet klausner and the other plot reveals and the kids using the book review site as a playground its hard to get a true review. Klausner and these plot revealers should be banned from posting along with these kids who use this site to play. Come on bn, when are you going to put a stop to this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A well done re-imagining of the Peter Pan story. The narrarator gets a little tedious, but nonetheless a good read.
angie_ranck on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
i really liked the beginning of this book(the reason for 3 stars instead of 2) but once paul reached The Anyplace it was all downhill from there. maybe it's just me though, i don't like the original Peter Pan all that much either.
PitcherBooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you haven't read the original two versions of Peter Pan by James Barrie, I'd recommend doing so first. Not required but you'd probably enjoy this gem of a book even more so if you do. Totally love the author's story-telling style and this is a worthy 'sequel' to the original Peter Pans. I think if Barrie were alive today, he'd be quite pleased also with this edition! Of course, if you don't care for the originals (shame on you!), you might as well skip this one. Either you have the heart for it... or you don't... So even tho my bookshelves are jammed as it is, I'm making room for this one. It's a keeper!
bigorangemichael on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Not exactly a sequel and not exactly a retelling of the Peter Pan story, Peter David's "Tigerheart" is more of a reimagined modernization of the classic story along the lines of his King Arthur trilogy and "Howling Mad." David succeeds beautifully at weaving the story of Peter Pan for a modern audience. But instead of focusing on Peter as the central character, David creates his own, Paul Dear. Early in the story, Paul's baby sister dies, causing a rift between his parents and their separation. Determined to make his mother happy again, Paul sets out to Anywhere to find a new sister and bring her home to his mother. Along the way, he meet the Boy, who is the kind of Anywhere, refusing to grow up, self-centered and having fantastic adventures. David tells the story in a omniscient narrator voice with brilliant asides to the audience. The story is modern but also timeless with references to modern day drugs to stop little boys from having fantastic adventures in their imagination. But while it does have those hints of the modern world, the storytelling and the universe are timeless.If you're familiar with Peter Pan either from the popular Disney movie or from the J.M. Barie original story, you're in for a treat with David's unique take on the story. Reading "Tigerheart," I found myself wishing David had written this years ago so that it would have been adapted for the big-screen as "Hook" instead of the movie we got. Seeing Steven Spielberg create this world would have been wonderful.While it's marketed for young adults, I have to say that "Tigerheart" is a joy and delight for anyone who hasn't or doesn't want to lose touch with their inner child. One of the best books I've read this year and one that I heartily recommend.
readinggeek451 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very original take on the Peter Pan story, full of sly asides and contemporary relevance. It should appeal to a wide range of readers from preteens to adults.
LiteraryFeline on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the houses my family lived in while I was growing up had a living room (as opposed to the family room) that was free of furniture except for a chair and several bookcases. It served as a playroom for my brother and I. I would often set up cities and neighborhoods for my paper dolls and barbies or my brother's cars (which I loved to play with too). Other times my brother and I would build our own boats and pretend the red carpet was the raging sea. We went on adventure after adventure.And so it was with those memories in mind that I entered the Anyplace, a world where imagination and belief in a bit of magic are more than just pretend play. When I first heard about Peter David's Tigerheart a couple of years ago, I was excited about reading it. Somehow though I never managed to get to it. Until now. I confess my enthusiasm had waned some and upon reading the synopsis on the back cover, I wasn't sure I was really interested in reading it anymore. The story itself sounded interesting, but the idea of reading a book that is sort of a spin off of another (the author refers to it as a pastiche), more famous story was off putting. Still, I figured I'd at least give it a try and see how far I could get.I was pulled in from the very first and never looked back from there. This is one of those books that is aimed for all ages. As I read, I could see myself sharing the story with my daughter while at the same time, the novel is written in such a way that appealed to me as an adult as well.I doubt there are many people out there who have not heard of J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan. His story is legendary. Peter Pan is the boy who never grew up. His adventures with Wendy and her brothers are known all over the world. I have never read Barrie's book although I have seen various versions of the story in movie form. Author Peter David's love for the story of Peter Pan began in his childhood and extended into his adulthood. He loved J.M. Barrie's story and decided to continue it in his own way, while at the same time paying homage to the original.Although the familiar famous names are different in Tigerheart, there is no doubting which character represents the original ones. Captain Hook has become Captain Hack; Gweeny used to be Wendy; Tinkerbell is now Fiddlefix; and Peter Pan has become simply The Boy. The hero of the novel, however, and who the story really is about is Paul Dear.Paul grew up on stories about the Anyplace and The Boy. His father encouraged him to believe while his mother would rather he grow up and forget all that nonsense. Everything in Paul's experience tells him the stories are true--for he has seen The Boy with his very own eyes. He was spent time with the pixies. When tragedy strikes his family, his world is turned upside down. His mother is severely unhappy and Paul is determined to do what he can to make her happy again. With the help of the pixie Fiddlefix, Paul flies off to the Anyplace one night, much to the chagrin of his mother.What follows is an assortment of quests and adventures. There are pirates and sirens, a great white tiger, the Piccas, the Bully Boys, shadows, and, of course, The Boy. It a wonderfully fun story, full of humor and hijinks. The novel also has its serious side, however, centering around the themes of growing up, among other things.In many respects I thought of Paul and The Boy as being two sides of one coin, both so much alike and yet very different. They both love adventure and are brave and imaginative. The Boy and Paul have very different philosophies about growing up. Paul knows it is inevitable and accepts it, even welcomes it. The Boy, on the other hand, wants nothing to do with growing up. He wants to hold onto the magic of childhood forever. He'd been betrayed by an adult and sees adults as the cause of all the world's ills.The adult in me raised an eyebrow at how the novel came to an end, but the child in me was quite delighted. Still, it seemed fitting for the type of tale it was.
horomnizon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Absolutely marvelous! A great fantasy book based on the character of Peter Pan, here simply 'the Boy'. Not just another take off on the same old story, but a whole newly imagined tale. Lots of fun - the narrator draws you in to the story and is quite humorous. Would be great fun read aloud to younger children and is a delight for all ages. I loved it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great story! I love this twist of a classic tale!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved they way this was writen!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excuse me but how is this legal? Kids, read peter pan and forget this book, it would be like you making a drawing and the kid next to you photocopied it, drew over it and turned it in. How mad would you be? What's happening in the book world? Topsy turvy !
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very cool read! There are times I laughed, got mad and even teary eyed along with the characters. The book is similar to Peter Pan but so much deeper. Overall, great book.
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Zuanie More than 1 year ago
Paul Dear is a sweet boy whose family is a perfect portrait of happiness. But that picture is broken with the disappearance of his baby sister. Through the ambiguous suggestion of the narration, one can guess that she was fatally ill. Overwhelmed with anguish, Paul's mother began to neglect his needs. And with increasing tension between the Dear's spouses, his father also moves out of their house. In solitude, Paul seeks comfort from the animals and from his dream. Yes, he is a special child who can speak the language of animals and go on adventures within the boundary of dreams. If that is all the story offers, isn't it just another Where the wild things are kind of book. But that is not the case. Paul's devotion to his mother urges him to take on the quest of finding another newborn baby to replace the one they have lost. And where else is a better place to look for a child than the Neverland, or the Anyplace as it's called in this particular book? Tigerheart reminds me of Pan's Labyrinth; it's a story about children, if not necessarily for children. It leads readers to a world full of vibrant, never-ending adventures with insidious fairies, talking animals, valiant Indian, salvage pirates, and not to mention, The Boy that never grows up. Yet at times, that world is so grim and violent. More often I found myself overwhelmed with melancholy or at loss at the cruel realism the story displays. "Oh gosh, no child should go through such heart-breaking or horrible experience" is what I kept thinking. Therefore, despite that many critics have praised Tigerheart as "the book for all ages", I am still uncertain whether it makes a suitable bedtime story for children under 10. That is not to say Tigerheart is a bad book, more likely the opposite. It's one of the most creative retellings of the ever-loved Peter Pan. Although in the book, Paul is the hero, Peter Pan is the second lead. Unlike the children travelling to the Anyplace to avoid adulthood, Paul's adventure is mature and selfless as his ultimate goal is to make his mother happy once again. Tigerheart flows effortlessly with creative narration and witty comments, lending subtle wisdom to the story without being preachy. I came to the book with an expectation for a conventional children lit. You know, the type of books with carefree escapades and triumphs awaiting the heroes at the end. And this fixative belief is what constantly shook me up. Tigerheart is nothing as such. As I've mentioned above, there is more than a grain of realistic symbolism in the story. Paul's quest is not always joyful; it's plagued with regret and somewhat violent death of both friends and foes. It turns out that David Peter is an avid comic writer, now that explains a lot about the warfare-and-violence feeling I've been sensing throughout the book. However, at its very core, Tigerheart is a beautiful story about both the pain and the joy of growing up, and yet know that your day of adventure will never stop just because you're an adult. It's a heartbreaking yet profound sentiment I can relate to.