Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim

Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim

by Sabeeha Rehman

Hardcover

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Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Finnlove More than 1 year ago
I loved THREADING MY PRAYER RUG.....it makes our nation sit up and take notice of how much we need to embrace different cultures and ideas....we have become a nation of bias and fear. Most people are good people , trying to find a better life for themselves and their families..Bravo to Sahbeeha Rehman for giving us such a wonderful and insightful look into American Muslim Life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All Americans should read this book to learn more about the beauty and culture of the Muslim Communities both in Pakistan and in America. The story of Sabeeha’s arranged marriage in Pakistan is riveting. It is charmingly written with love, sensitivity and humor depicting the very intricate rituals the bride, groom and their families practice to find a suitable marriage partner. In her case she has found her soul mate for life. The rest of her book, in America, takes us through Sabeeha’s forty year journey of assimilation and struggle to maintain her religious, cultural beliefs and family values, and incorporate them into becoming an American. Not only does she assimilate, but becomes an advocate and leader in interfaith organizations. She takes pride in being a devout Muslim and an American. Her warmth and love of her family and people in general is embracing to the reader. This book is written in an easy reading conversational style as Sabeetha talks directly to reader. I believe this is a MUST READ memoir.…Kathy Wilson author of Out of the Rabbit Hole.
Farhana Liaqat More than 1 year ago
The description of Sabeeha's experiences and challenges can be related to most of the Pakistani female lives which keep on increasing the readers' interest chapter after chapter. But her journey through different religions and cultures by maintaining the integrity of a Muslim, is really inspiring for the youth; immigrant or non immigrant, muslim or non muslim.
BettyTaylor More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this remarkable memoir of a Pakistani Muslim lady and her family evolving into an American-Pakistani Muslim. I suspect all religious minorities in the US can relate to quite a few of her challenges. Khalid Rehman is doing his residency in New York when his family and Sabeeha’s family negotiate an arranged marriage for them. They are married in Pakistan and then take off to the US to start their life together. Sabeeha is immediately confronted with culture shock. She soon realizes that it will be a challenge to fit into her new home while also maintaining her deep faith as a Muslim. And the challenges increase as their two sons grow into the American culture. Sabeeha tells us of the reactions of American non-Muslims when there has been a terrorist attack involving a Muslim, and of the reaction of the American Muslim community. She also tells of the compassionate non-Muslim Americans who stood beside them through turbulent times. She became an advocate for interfaith relations. But to me, the most interesting part comes toward the end of the book when she focuses on how culture influences the religion, and how a unique Muslim American is developing – an entity that holds true to its faith while absorbing traits of the country they now live in and love. Back when Sabeeha met Khalid she agreed to come to the US for only two years. They have now been married for over 40 years and have been in the US most of that time – and have become American citizens.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thank you, New York Times, for an editorial earlier this summer that mentioned this book. On a basic level, it's an entertaining read (author is an excellent writer and story teller), and as a one-in-a-million American of Scottish/Irish descent (Christian, non-Catholic heritage), I enjoyed learning a lot more about what it was like for a young Pakistani Muslim woman to move to the United States over 45 years ago. And, her explanations of her cultural and religious heritage were easy to understand. More importantly, though, I was deeply moved by Sabeeha's courage to share her life story and her hopes and fears, and for her extreme goodness as a human being who cares about making the world a better, more peaceful place, where there is room for all of our different heritages and beliefs. She gave me hope that we can move the world toward a more peaceful place of understanding and acceptance. This would be an outstanding book for a book club, because it needs to be discussed. Bravo!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent resource for becoming acquainted with the Muslim faith and ethos at the everyday (as compared with the sensational) level. The world needs to read this book.
Farhana Liaqat More than 1 year ago
The description of Sabeeha's experiences and challenges can be related to most of the Pakistani female lives which keep on increasing the readers' interest chapter after chapter. But her journey through different religions and cultures by maintaining the integrity of a Muslim, is really inspiring for the youth; immigrant or non immigrant, muslim or non muslim.