The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election

The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election

by Malcolm Nance

Hardcover

$7.98
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Tuesday, October 22

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and Wikileaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Malcolm Nance is an American hero and this book is a must read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brilliant portrayal of current U.S. concern.
loyolanaveendonnayyonex More than 1 year ago
th
loyolanaveendonnayyonex More than 1 year ago
th
BonnieBonnie More than 1 year ago
This book was very well written. I feel that it shared a lot of useful information to someone who before this was pretty unaware of what was going on. there was only a few times where I felt the author was covering things that did not need to be covered and I only felt he was being biased a few times. He did a good job with the information, helping lead you from one point to the next with relative ease. You can tell that this is not his first book and it is certainly not his first time covering this topic. I would give this book a recommendation being the fact that it covers a lot of information and it isn't the hardest thing in the world to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I feel that the information was presented pretty well and organized well. There was some things that were put in that felt like they were out of place at first but the author did a good job at working it into the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mr. Nance presents a clear and straight forwrd path that was taken to undermine the 2016 election. Having seen him on various tv shows i could hear his voice as i read his words. He brings to the page his years of experience in the fields connected to terrorism. I thank him for this endeavor. 9494
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Andrew_of_Dunedin More than 1 year ago
What is “known”? If, by “known”, you mean “in possession of irrefutable evidence”, you are not destined to work in the intelligence community. On the other hand, if you can deal with educated interpretations of various pieces of evidence, and can live with words like “high certainty”, “likely”, and “highly improbable”, you might do well in that field. I bring this up because it is the basis of Malcolm Nance's book “The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election”. If a foreign power undertook an effort to influence an American election, the likelihood that they would leave behind incontrovertible evidence is almost nil. (Aside: The likelihood that the people finding that evidence would survive to report on it could also be questionable.) Author Nance interprets various pieces of evidence – finding a computer worm that was originally coded using a Cyrillic keyboard, spoof websites that are based in former Russian satellite states, and admissions made publicly by 3rd parties – to paint a picture that Russia's leader wanted to ensure the results of the 2016 Presidential election were acceptable to him and his interests. It must be pointed out that the author never claims that Republican candidate and eventual winner Donald Trump was an active party to these mechanisms. (There is a possibility, however, that some of his advisers – ones outside of the official campaign structure – had some level of awareness.) This book is definitely worth a read. Rating: 4 1/2 stars, rounded up to 5 stars where 1/2 stars are not permitted. DISCLOSURE: This book was provided free of charge in a random draw. No conditions were placed upon entry or acceptance, but a request for an honest and prompt review was implied.