Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe

by Daniel Defoe

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Robinson Crusoe (Collins Classics) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 216 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robinson Crusoe was an excellent read. Entertaining and eductional. I used it as a read-aloud to my kids. They were a little skiddish at the graphic depiction of the cannibalization (who could blame them), but they thoroughly enjoyed the book. The introduction in the B&N Classics Series is worth a read too. It gives interesting insight into Defoe's life and motivation for writing the novel. The endnotes are essentially nonexistent, which is too bad. The B&N Classics often (but not always) have very good endnotes to better describe what the author was intending to convey. Not in this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book and I am only 8! I read it in third grade and I wanna read it again on my NOOK now that I am 11. THANK YOU DANIEL DEFOE for making this AWESOME book.
Charlito More than 1 year ago
This book is deeper than I first imagined. I was supposed to read this in school but I never took the time to do so. Now in my late 30's I decided to read it on my nook. I was surprised to find that this book is more about self discovery and how Crusoe discovers where he fits into God's plan. Key ideas involved in the book are of mastery, spirituality, & morality. Crusoe becomes a man one can truly respect.
Cougar_H More than 1 year ago
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe is about a man named Robinson Crusoe who decides to go out to sea and gets stuck on an island with very little to survive with. It really made me think about what I would do if I was in his situation. I would probably be hopeless in his situation and not last nearly as long as he did. In fact I would probably go insane If I was stuck on an island with no civilization and none of the things I use now. It was interesting how his parents were actually right when they told him not to go out to sea. In a lot of books I read the child usually is right and the parents are holding them back but in this one the child was wrong. His decision was probably a good one since he was doing what he wanted to do but It would have been better if he had done something else that didn't involve something so dangerous. I feel bad for Robinson though because what happened was so random and he didn't do much to deserve it. He also learned very fast and adapted to his environment quite quickly. Kind of like the first settlers in America he didn't have to much but he conquered the environment. For example he intermediately started thinking about where to stay when he landed on the beach, and how he made a canoe out of a tree. It was a bit boring at the beginning but all it was a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great classic novel! Anyone who loves a good adventure should read this! It is never boring, each page reveals something new. And Defoe's writing style is amazing! Some of the classic novelists are tough to follow but Defoe writes in a way that is so easy to follow and engaging.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Plot of this story was very good. It started out with a man named Robinson Crusoe. He was faced with a challenge when he went out to sea and was shipped wrecked off the coast of Trinidad in search of slaves from Africa. So he was against the element of being stranded on land without food and anything to use. So he had to find someone or a village to use as a resource. As doing so he was put up against cannibals. Robinson killed one man and injured a few but fought them off and was safe to live another day. He then later met a native man named Friday. Friday taught and showed him how to fish hunt and found them a cave to sleep in. In exchange Crusoe taught Friday some English so he could speak. They later then had a conflict with Friday wanting to leave and find his own people. So then Friday and Crusoe had a problem with the cannibals. So the fought and killed the cannibals saving three men which one of them was Fridays father. Then Friday felt obligated to help Crusoe get off the island. So he saw an approaching English ship and planned to take it over. The next day he did so and Robinson Crusoe¿s life was turned around and he went back to England. In this selection the author made it so the character really changed over the staory. In the beginning he was pretty quite and did what his dad said. But later in the story his dad wanted him to do something he didn¿t want to do and Crusoe wanted to be a sailor . Later he was a sailor and he was ship wrecked. He was scared and wondering. Then he met Friday and he began to become enlightened. He struggled a lot before he met Friday. Friday really liked him. He liked him so much he took over an English boat and captured it for Robinson Crusoe. This selection was third person. They used the people¿s proper names and him, him, her, her, them, and them. This makes the story sounds like it was written along time ago and it was. So the author made it just how he wanted to. This made the story very interesting. My personal view was great on this story this was one of the best books I have ever read. I read it twice because I enjoyed it so much and I really don¿t like reading. I liked how the author portrayed the characters. That made it fun to read. Also I recommend this book to anyone who loves action, and always something going on in a story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For the past two years I've been trying to read Robinson Crusoe and I just couldn't sit and read the 'olde english' or mabye I just was to young, I don't know. I decided to try again for the third time and by page 30 I fell in love with this book. Not only does Defoe show the enterprising Crusoe before being castawayed, but he shows a psychological battle between man and the wild, I at frist thought that Crusoe was 'cheating' by taking ALL that stuff from the ship, but it evens out after being there for 28 years! I really enjoyed the action sequences and couldn't help notice a spiritual journey going on through-out this book and really made me think about my faith. Over all I loved this book and now I can survive on a desert isle, Sadnap eht evas osla. 'read backwards'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Robinson Crusoe is a story of a man who wants to become a sailor, but his father doesn't want him to. He went on one voyage and it didn't turn out so well, so Robinson was sent home  by the captain, then he met another captain who offered to take him on a voyage. Robinson gets shipwrecked on an island and survives alone for seven years. This story is exciting and depressing. It's exciting because there are pirates. It's depressing because lots of people die.  
BrianKurzhal 8 months ago
Driven from a loving family and a comfortable, secure life by an unswerving compulsion for the high seas, Crusoe finds successive misfortunes and escapes culminating in near-death disaster and emerging as lone survivor. Initially, 28-years of isolation are filled with bitter, overwhelming disappointment, depression, despondency, regret, and remorse. Quite slowly, quiet reflection produces spiritual transformation and inner peace. Thoughtful reading of the Bible leads to Christian faith, which produces hope, gratitude, and longsuffering. Intentional, stark reframing reveals the island's previously unrecognized, unappreciated beauty and abundance. Industry and ingenuity secure survival, even a thriving state of affairs in terms of sustenance and occupation. Confidence, forethought, hard-earned survivalist insights, and persuasive oratory skills coalesce to fully equip Crusoe to create a cohesive and effective micro team, which overcomes deadly, superior odds. Robinson is ultimately rewarded richly with the help of life-long, faithful and true friends. The reader is well-rewarded by the twisting plot and its 300-year old perspective, values, and stirring dialogues. As Apostle Paul succinctly noted 2,000-years ago to his protégé, Timothy, "If we have food and covering, with these we shall be content" (1 Timothy 6:8), and also to his converts in Philippi, "Not that I speak from want, for I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need. I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me" (Philippians 4:11-13).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There was a lot of adventure in this book. Survival in unforseen situations is intriguing to me so this book was great. How he was able to survive by himself for 28 years is beyond me. I do not think I would have the same courage. Wonderfully written!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It should be noted that this book did in fact have chapters and this rendition did not have such. It made reading for my classes far more difficult as we had different versions of the same story. Aside from that, I can't say that I much cared for the story. It was among the most dry piece literature I have read to date and because of the smallness of the print, very difficult to reread passages I did not quite understand or had gotten lost in completely. If it meant having to read a thicker book, I would have welcomed a larger font.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It sure isn't your modern novel. The action ebbs and flows (& ocasionally stagnates). But it was the very first novel, I'm told; so in that light, it's a good start. There are weaknesses in the plot -- places where I ask, "oh, why didn't he just ______?!?" But those can be used as jumping-off places for discussion, in a class or even within your own thoughts. Things that make one think are not wasted. In a few places it gets a little preachy, but in others there is humor and even tenderness as the main character lets us into his thoughts and feelings. As a survival guide it's rather a poor choice; Crusoe made a few good choices, but many lousy ones; and he took way too long before he began to take responsibility for his actions, instead of having 'pity-parties'. The language is not as archaic as Shakespeare's, but is sufficiently 'old-style' to encourage the mind to slow down & think (or slow down and feel), instead of simply rushing quickly on to the next thing, as we tend to do in this age. Even granting this, the latter part of the book is labored, as if added later upon requirement. I found myself wishing the travels through European forests would "just END, already!". So, to sum up: enjoy the storyline, and when something irks you, examine it and learn from it, and then go and do better. Whether that's a stupid decision Crusoe makes, or a writing style that bugs you: learn from it. It's a classic for good reason.
ClassicColin More than 1 year ago
Finished Robinson Crusoe in just one week. Well written, well told, and hugely entertaining. Pick it up now!
Robert Delaat More than 1 year ago
I would recomend this book for adventurous people! Do not read if you are under the age of 8!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ??????????????????????
Charles Jaskolski More than 1 year ago
this book was the best ive ever read with so.many twists and turns
Fredrick More than 1 year ago
This book is radical! I will admit that having seen the movie I was sure it was going to suck really bad, but this book out passed all my expectations and is my favorite book.
HeyJude More than 1 year ago
This is a story of survival. Most of us, in Robinson Crusoe's circumstances, would not survive. He makes it because of determination and resourcefulness. I was bothered by a couple of loose ends in the story; e.g., what ultimately happens to Friday?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be exciting and captivating, and was definately worth putting the time into reding it. Robinson Crusoe was beautifully written and interestingly thought-out. I can't wait to read something else by Daniel Defoe
Guest More than 1 year ago
I expected a little more from the awe-inspiring Robinson Crusoe, but it really wasn't as good as everyone thinks it is. I felt there were some parts that Defoe skipped in the book that really needed to be written, for example he tells nothing of Crusoe's voyage back to England after being saved. But I must say, the plot line was clever and I liked how Crusoe was able to solve each and every one of his problems, maybe even some he shouldn't have been able to...
Guest More than 1 year ago
Standing in front of all the B&N classics I picked this book. I found that the book was at somepoints a little slow when he was going into how he found God and connected with him. I however, then realized how important his thoughts and notes on his connections with God were for the book after finishing it. The book overall was great! I loved the vivid and great detail on the island and his different places he made home. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys adventure, and books that deal with survival.
richard015 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Robinson Crusoe was bored with his quiet life in England,so desided to go sea.But one day,his ship overturned and he reached the uninhabited island alone.This book is very interesting. I was impressed by his caurage. I think I want to be brave person like him.
Meerkat4 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
WHAT A GREAT BOOK! The basic gist of the story is a man (Robinson Crusoe) gets stranded on an island for 28 some odd years. First off, the thing I noticed was: "look at what you get when you don't listen to your elders!" (Robinson, being the prodigal son, defied his father and left for a life at sea. As it turns out, it almost gets him killed in his first trip! Then he settles down in S. America and gets rich, but still gets that nagging feeling of adventure. So, in the spirit of Bilbo Baggins, he go's on an adventure for his own reasons. Didn't turn out well, because he got shipwrecked. It really represents the internal battle of spirited adventure, and that of following a responsible path in life. One is secure, stable, and boring. The other is fun, wild, and, as it turns out, deadly. Crusoe makes the best out of his situation, taming the wild area the best he could. the actual physical story is compelling, but where this book separates itself is its ability to tape the feeling, struggles, and emotions we have in our daily lives, and apply them loosely to the over arching struggles of Crusoe. I don't really know how to explain it, it's just a profound book, and perhaps even more functional in its application to life for a teenager, whom is struggling with those questions in their lives more so than an adult. I will make my daughter read this book., no doubt about that.
morryb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a tale of redemption and a man learning to become thankful under the most trying of circumstance. After not heeding the advice of his father or other warning, Robinson Crusoe is stranded on a deserted Island. After struggles in setting up a home, he becomes violently ill and for the first time calls out to God for help. It is form this point that Crusoe realizes that while he may be stranded that the others have gone to their grave. He also realized that God is a God of grace, and that is while he is still alive. Later as he encounters Friday he realized that one of his primary purposes is to spread the gospel to Friday. As he teaches Friday his own faith continues to grow and become deeper. The inner struggles are what make the tale and have made it a favorite among many such as Teddy Roosevelt and John Adams. While I am not in the same category as these men, it certainly remains a favorite of mine through many years.
lyzadanger on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This pillar of Western literature, considered by many to be the first English novel, left me ambivalent and uncomfortable. Its antiquated mores clash with modern perspective, but not just because of quaint antiquity: Defoe's Puritanical self-assuredness and cultural ignorance (resulting in subjugation) seem ominous in light of present-day conflicts.Is it a fun read? Sure, most of the time. Defoe's meticulous discussions of castaway lifestyle are captivating, if telescoped (a few paragraphs often represent years of island isolation for Crusoe). But because this is a masterful work, and does carry with it a serious message, passages about literal survival are interrupted by multi-page religious epiphanies as Crusoe faces his eternal survival. Crusoe's is a colonial white man's world. There is not a single real female character in the entire story. Anyone not European is a savage, meant for enslavement. Defoe's proud intolerance is not uncommon for the time, but paralleled with his relatively unsmiling Puritan tenets, it can feel downright grim. What is left unanswered for me is whether Defoe was aware of this hubris, whether it's a trick on the reader that Crusoe is so blithely superior, that I'm the fool for not understanding that he was winking the whole time.
strandbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
So first off I should say that I skimmed the last 150 pages of Robinson Crusoe. I enjoyed the part about him stranded on the island and learning to survive. I found all of the travels afterwards tedious and boring. I've often heard that saying that the more you travel the more you notice how alike people are rather than their differences. Not so for Crusoe. In the beginning he seems pretty accepting of everyone, then as he turns to religion he spreads the word of God, but by the end he is attempting to burn towns of "savages" and "heathens" and destroy their idols. Also, one more annoyance in this book was the use of the word viz. over and over again.