The Judas Goat (Spenser Series #5)

The Judas Goat (Spenser Series #5)

by Robert B. Parker

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Judas Goat (Spenser Series #5) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 46 reviews.
g-reader More than 1 year ago
Excellent book. Robert B. Parker is the master of mystery writing. Every book he writes is wonderful. You just can't put them down!!
bezoar44 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the first Robert Parker novel I've read; an obituary described his writing as having lifted the voice of hard boiled detective fiction out of the noir context, and into a happier, lighter world. I was curious to see what that would be like. I found myself liking Spenser, the narrator, immensely: he's unimpressed with wealth or power, self-confident, faithful to his commitments. His banter with his black colleague Hawk shows that he's not a racist, that he's not paralyzed by white guilt and can actually have a black friend; he appreciates attractive women but fights off temptation and stays faithful to his lover -- and manages great erotically charged conversations with her. Plus, he's got a heart of gold, and tries to avoid unnecessary brutality.Then I stepped back, and started thinking about Parker the author, and the frame of the story. Part of why Spenser comes off as so personally sympathetic is that Parker throws him a series of racist, misogynist tropes to disavow. Hawk is the mysterious black Other -- cool and controlled, but with animal violence just waiting to erupt, and unconstrained sexuality. The femme fatale is a nymphomaniac who doesn't really have a character of her own; she's there to tempt Spenser and illustrate Hawk's sexual charisma. Ultimately, the world Parker creates is pretty repugnant. I wonder if Parker intended it to be read ironically, or if he just used the tropes he had at hand without feeling any particular responsibility for them.
dickcraig on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was one of my more favorite Spencer novels. Spencer is hired by a wealthy tycoon to track down a terrorist gang. He will get paid $2500 for each captured or killed. The chase begins in London, where he is joined by Hawk. The action moves to the Montreal Olympic Games. The Judas, or the person who betrays the group, is encountered early and is followed by Spencer throughout the story. I thought it was a decent plot and since I love Hawk so much, his early entry in the story made it that more enjoyable. I love the relationship between Hawk and Spencer.
tvoskuhl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you like Spenser this is one of the two best Spenser books out there (Catskill Eagle is the other one).
Gilbert_M_Stack More than 1 year ago
A “Judas goat” is an animal trained to lead a herd (sheep, cattle) into a pen and quite often to slaughter. It’s a very apt title for this early Spenser novel in which the detective is hired to track down nine people who tossed a bomb into a London restaurant, crippling the client and murdering his wife and two daughters. There are no real leads, so Spenser takes an ad out in the paper offering a reward for information about the killers hoping they will do something to give him that one all-important lead. They do and the lead he gets is a look at one of the women attached to the group—a woman he uses to lead him to all of the others. One of the peculiar things about this novel is there is a lot of “waiting” in it—waiting while conducting surveillance, waiting to see if there really are assassins in Spenser’s rooms and whether or not they will tip their hands, etc. Somehow, Parker manages both to show how difficult Spencer finds it to maintain his focus through these periods and yet at the same time make them very interesting to the reader. I was surprised to learn that there can be so much tension in waiting. Naturally there is quite a lot of nail-biting action as well. Parker’s novels move quickly from first page to last and always leave you satisfied.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another great story from the late Robert Parker.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love thus story because it introduces the Spenser hawk team that makes Parkers series so classic. I have read all the books several times, thus one is a go-to when I have an afternoon go spend with two old friends, Spenser and Hawk.
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BronxAngelReview More than 1 year ago
Another excellent Spencer adventure. Parker with be missed.
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